Tag Archives: challenge

Challenge – Inspired by Dorothy Parker

As I mentioned in a recent post, Dorothy Parker has a number of pieces which I call “monologue stories”.  These tend to be just the inner thoughts of the MC or the MC’s one-side of a conversation.  I’ve always enjoyed reading these as they allow the reader to become fully immersed in the personality of the MC.  You are literally experiencing the events of the story through the MC.  

I have written one of these styled stories before, but it wasn’t that great.  However, I am challenging myself, and anyone else who is interested, to give it a try.  Can you tell an entire story through only the thoughts of your MC?  It’s a lot more challenging than it sounds.  If you need inspiration, you can turn to Parker – Lady With a Lamp, or her more humorous examples, The Waltz or A Telephone Call.  I will see if I can keep mine down to flash fiction length (a constant challenge for me), and post a final here when I’m done.

Happy writing!

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Everybody Has A Story

Recently, I’ve read several articles about personal essay writing.  They’ve ranged from writing tips to how to get your personal essay published.  Now I don’t know if any of my readers are this way, but when I repeatedly run into the same theme across several different mediums over at least a few days I will usually succumb to the inspiration.  In this case, I did, and I am inviting you to share in the inspiration with me.

My theory is that a personal essay is the best practice you can do as a writer.  While it is important to exercise your imagination by coming up with new stories, that creative measure can be distracting.  If your intent is to practice your wordsmithing, what better place to begin than in your memory.  We know our own stories, certainly better than someone else’s and even better than those we could make up since we haven’t actually made them up yet. It seems to me an ideal way to play with narrative – description, dialog, and character – since you know the whole story so intimately.

So, I challenge you to pick an event – big or small – from your life and write it.  The only recommendation I would put forth is to make sure the event you choose is one that was transforming in some way.  Like any good story, your main character should be dynamic, and, in this case, that main character is you.  Feel free to come back and share your experience in the comments.  Let us know if you seek publication!

Enjoy!

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A Picture And A Thousand Words

They say, “a picture is worth a thousand words”.  Care to see how many you can get?  Try this exercise:

Go through an old photo album, and look for a picture with people, whether or not you are in the picture doesn’t matter.  If you prefer, find a photography book, or check out an artist’s show, or look some up online.  The important thing is that there be at least one person in the picture.  Once you’ve found a picture right a short “story” or explanation of what is going on in that picture.  Focus on describing the moment captured in film, not what happened before or what may happen after.  Just describe what’s happening in that picture.  But do so in detail.  What is the activity and why is it happening?  What are the relationships among the people pictured?  What do they think of one another?  (If the picture you choose is of a memorable moment in your own life, try to stretch your creativity, and come up with a different story than what actually happened.)  Hopefully, you can find a good story somewhere in there.

 

 

 

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Y – “You”, Another Pronoun

“You”

So, I spent sometime on the pronoun “one”. Now, for “you”. For this, I would like to present a challenge.

When we write, what POV do we usually choose? As a general rule, a writer will pick either first or third person. A first person narrator is almost always an active character in the story, but not necessarily the protagonist. He/she can sometimes be an outside character with information on the story and characters within, but will generally be fairly limited in his/her knowledge. In rare cases, such as The Book Thief (in which the narrator is Death) or The Lovely Bones (in which the narrator is a young girl who has been killed), the narrator may be omniscient, but usually first person operates on a limited amount of knowledge that can be reasonably known by the character who is narrating. A third person narrator has a few options that make it an “easier” POV to work within. There is the subjective narrator who can describe feelings and/or thoughts of one or more characters, or the objective narrator who focuses only on action of the characters. Alongside this element there is the knowledge of the narrator, being either omniscient – an all knowing narrator with knowledge of all times, people, places, and events including characters’ thoughts; or limited – usually focused on one character’s experience and feelings and thoughts. But the second person narrator is extremely rare in fiction, and difficult to pull off well. According to a Wikipedia article on Narrative Modes, a good example of this form is Bright Lights, Big City by Jay McInerney. (I have not read this, but it is now officially on my list, if for no other reason but that I want to see how he does this.) It is also employed by writers of the “Choose Your Own Adventure” books that were popular in the 80s and which I love and miss. (Every time you read it, you can make it a different story – two, three, four, or more books in one!) As this POV is so rarely used, and very difficult, I wonder how many readers may take advantage of the challenge to write your second person story. The nice thing about reading this type of story is the reader is immediately required to submit as an active participant in the story. If written well, I suspect this type of narration can be highly engaging to readers as they are literally pulled into the story from the beginning. If you choose to take part in this challenge, please share in the comments what you learn from it and your successes with your story. We are interested to hear how your experiment turns out!

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V – Voice: Who Said That!?!

As I was reading, I started thinking about how hard it is for me to differentiate my characters’ voices.  It has been a consistent comment in notes on my MS and some other work I’ve done.  To practice, I decided to try an exercise based on my WIP.  Give this a try if you find the same difficulty in your work.

Write a “Point/ Counter-Point” of sorts from the POVs of two of your characters who have experienced the same event.   Would they see things differently? -Put more emphasis or importance on one event versus another?  How would their use of language differ?  Focus on really getting into the head of the character you are writing and see it from his/ her POV.

As a former actress (READ: local community and high school theater circuit), I can’t believe it has taken me so long to get the idea of adapting an old performance exercise into a writing exercise.  If I think of anymore, I will certainly share them, but the only one that is popping in my head at present doesn’t really translate to writing; unless of course you want to increase your typing speed.  Annunciation practice for writers!

Red leather, yellow letter, copper kettle, brittle brattle, skidaddily dee, skidaddily doo.

 

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U – Utopia: The Fight For Equal Time

In recent years, there have been a surge in dystopian fiction, especially in Young Adult (YA) fiction.  Books like The Hunger Games and Divergent seem to be popping up constantly.  Dystopia is a nice plot device in that it automatically sets up an atmosphere of survival and conflict, allowing the protagonist the opportunity to become a hero.

But something we do not see as often are Utopian novels.  Granted, a state of perfection does not necessarily set up conflict, however, a clever writer could see the possibility for conflict in any setting.  For instance, the idea of perfection being too perfect.  Might a protagonist feel the wool is being pulled over his eyes, or feel threatened by an outside force that could ruin such a state?  I think of films, like Pleasantville and The Truman Show, in which the perfect world became the enemy either for being too close-minded or being a false world.   It seems to me, for all the terrible worlds we make for ourselves, could we not have a counterpoint of perfection, and find what struggles that may create?

 

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R – Recipes, And Other How-To’s: Entertaining NonFiction

Okay, I’m not usually one to put recipes on this site. That’s not what this is about, but as I was trying to come up with an “R” word that had to do with writing, I started thinking of another one of my favorite writers, Anthony Bourdain.  Some of you may be familiar with his former show on the Travel Channel, No Reservations.  Others may know him by his current show on CNN, Parts Unknown.  And some may know him best by his bestselling book, Kitchen Confidential; a (hate to tell you this) very realistic portrait of life working in restaurants.  But one of his books you may not have heard of is called the Les Halles Cookbook.  This is a book that he wrote which includes a number of french dishes that he cooked while working as head and executive chef at the New York Brasserie, Les Halles (a restaurant I am determined to dine in myself one of these days).

Now there may be some out there who are still thinking, “Okay, great.  What does this have to do with writing.”  Well, as I say, Anthony Bourdain is a writer, and he has a great gift with words and imagery.  And his cookbook is like none I’ve ever seen before or since.  He does not simply list ingredients and steps.  He tells you about the dish you are making, and gives you hints and secrets about the best way to cook it.  And he does all of this with a talent for the use of language.  If you can get it, I highly recommend you pick up the book.  This is the only cookbook I have ever sat down to read for entertainment.

So here’s a challenge: (Completely stealing this from a public speaking assignment I had in college.) Write a recipe, or other seemingly doldrum instruction oriented piece, but do so with not only the purpose of informing, but entertaining as well.  Instruction manuals, how-to guides, and cookbooks do not have to be boring to read.  As a matter of fact, they shouldn’t be.

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